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Canine Campus Training is hiring Training Assistants!

Do you love working with dogs?  Comfortable around groups of them and wanting to build your formal training experience?    Canine Campus is looking to hire part time assistants for a couple of weekday evenings and Saturday afternoon.  This position requires a well presented person that is comfortable speaking with owners, is punctual and has some experience in the dog world.  We will happily work with you to build your skill set working alongside our certified trainers!

If you’re interested, please send a note through our contact form and Lucinda will get back to you quickly.

Dogs on the bed!

What better way to spend quality time with  your dog than to share your bed with them?  Dogs love comfort just as much as humans do and being close to their human is as good as it gets.  There has been significant research done surrounding the concept that sleeping in the bed causes aggression and the general conclusion is that it does not.  Most dogs will continue to be happily part of a family bed and it will not cause any issues.  BUT, while most dogs will not experience any issues, the problem lies in the ones that may have a tendency to what’s referred to as resource guarding.  This tendency often does not show up in the first year of life, but may become more apparent as the dog reaches a state of maturity around 18-24  months of age, when they are more likely to attempt to assert themselves.

Resource guarding is defined as an animal’s effort to prevent access to their highly valued items, including  beds, laps, bones and toys through aggressive displays.   This is the number one cause of aggression towards family members and may be demonstrated through growling, lip lifting, air snaps or actual contact.  The key point here is that sleeping on the bed does not cause the aggressive display, but simply provides one more high value element to protect, and one that will necessarily include contact with a family member.

So if sleeping on the bed doesn’t cause aggression, why be concerned about it?  Many dog owners may not recognize the slow increase in protective behaviour that happens as their dog matures, until it has reached the point of a full challenge.  This challenge may never in fact happen, but if it does the long term impact on the relationship is a negative one.  For this reason, I highly recommend that dogs not be allowed to sleep on a regular basis on the bed for the first year, although inviting them up for a cuddle is great and a good first experience to teach them that this is a privilege to be earned and enjoyed.

Teaching dogs to wait for an invitation onto the bed helps them understand clearly that they should look for direction from their human when accessing high value resources.  It will also be important that the dog is taught a consistent ‘off’ command, so that at any given time they understand that maybe they’ll be on their dog bed tonight.  By practicing the protocol of getting the dog off the bed with no issues, the likelihood that they will feel entitled to protect the space is greatly diminished.

The key take away here is that your dog sleeping on the bed with you is wonderful, but that rules of use need to be introduced early on and followed through on, so that the dog that may just have a tendency to guard doesn’t feel that it is even remotely an issue in this situation.

Car Sickness

a safe doggy!

Car sickness is very common in young dogs, as the stress and anxiety of the ride causes them to hyperventilate and then vomit.  There are a number of things to do to minimize these occurrences:

  1. Don’t allow them to eat or drink much before the ride – the contents sloshing around in their belly adds to the feeling of nauseousness
  2. Bring them to the car at least once a day and don’t go anywhere at all.  On the third day, turn the engine on for a few moments.
  3. Feed them their dinner or give them a good chew bone in the car, then get them out with out going anywhere.  Trying to build positive associations
  4. When they’ll get in the car and sit happily for a few minutes, take a very short ride around the block – or maybe even just out of driveway and back.  We want them to get out of car while still relaxed
  5. ALWAYS use some type of restraint in the back seat or back of car.  Crate is ideal, but seat belt harness is good too.  When they can move around too much, it adds to the problem.
  6. If going for long rides, such as to the cottage, a baby dose of gravol can help with the motion sickness

Winter Dog Training Classes!

  When the weather gets so cold that we don’t want to go out, it’s the perfect time to work inside with your dogs!  We offer classes at all levels, using positive reinforcement which result in a dog that  wants to work with you!  We have everything from Puppy Kindergarten to Agility for Fun – including Manners and Advanced/Canine Good Neighbor Courses.

We believe in the power of positive reinforcement methods and appropriate/non physical corrections.  We focus on teaching canine manners to help you achieve the dog that is a pleasure to have in your home and in the park. We use voice, toy play and the randomized treat to motivate and correct pups – no harsh methods. Classes at Canine Campus are recommended and attended by area vets, rescue organizations and breeders who all know that we provide small, quality training classes. Check out the training page for more info, or give us a call! 905-477-8092