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Puppy Crate mate!

CratemateI always recommend that when bringing a new puppy home, owners find a stuffed dog for their new addition. Sometimes I get the feeling that people think this is a tad crazy! However, the puppies do appreciate their new buddy and most bond with it quickly – this has even been demonstrated with wild or captive bred animals, such as at zoos and rehabilitation centers.

 Try to remember that your puppy is likely leaving behind a litter of buddies and that the transition can be stressful on a number of levels. Puppies tend to sleep in “pig piles” when they’re together; completely on top of each other and cuddled up close for comfort. Suddenly, mom is gone, as are all the familiar sights, scents and sounds and they’re all alone in their crate or bed.

At this age, puppy vision is not highly advanced and they tend to see more generalized outlines and recognize color shades. So if you find a stuffed dog with similar size and coloring to their littermates, and the same type of ears – floppy or up – puppies will recognize them as their new buddy.

Help your puppy have a positive transition! Pick up a crate mate before bringing them home. Ideally, send it to the breeder in advance to be placed with the litter, or even just bring it on the day you pick up your puppy. Scent is the most advanced sense that dog’s have, even as puppies! A familiar item and scent will go a long way to reducing the stress of what can be a difficult transition.

Here’s Dante, happily curled up with a very chocolate lab looking toy!

Car Sickness

a safe doggy!

Car sickness is very common in young dogs, as the stress and anxiety of the ride causes them to hyperventilate and then vomit.  There are a number of things to do to minimize these occurrences:

  1. Don’t allow them to eat or drink much before the ride – the contents sloshing around in their belly adds to the feeling of nauseousness
  2. Bring them to the car at least once a day and don’t go anywhere at all.  On the third day, turn the engine on for a few moments.
  3. Feed them their dinner or give them a good chew bone in the car, then get them out with out going anywhere.  Trying to build positive associations
  4. When they’ll get in the car and sit happily for a few minutes, take a very short ride around the block – or maybe even just out of driveway and back.  We want them to get out of car while still relaxed
  5. ALWAYS use some type of restraint in the back seat or back of car.  Crate is ideal, but seat belt harness is good too.  When they can move around too much, it adds to the problem.
  6. If going for long rides, such as to the cottage, a baby dose of gravol can help with the motion sickness

Winter Dog Training Classes!

  When the weather gets so cold that we don’t want to go out, it’s the perfect time to work inside with your dogs!  We offer classes at all levels, using positive reinforcement which result in a dog that  wants to work with you!  We have everything from Puppy Kindergarten to Agility for Fun – including Manners and Advanced/Canine Good Neighbor Courses.

We believe in the power of positive reinforcement methods and appropriate/non physical corrections.  We focus on teaching canine manners to help you achieve the dog that is a pleasure to have in your home and in the park. We use voice, toy play and the randomized treat to motivate and correct pups – no harsh methods. Classes at Canine Campus are recommended and attended by area vets, rescue organizations and breeders who all know that we provide small, quality training classes. Check out the training page for more info, or give us a call! 905-477-8092